Jonathan Byrd

Stealing Money

Jonathan Byrd
Stealing Money

The sport of powerlifting has exploded into the main stream markets over the last several years. With that has come many gimmick products, people wanting to make a quick buck, and a grotesque number of self described experts. While strength levels are not always a good indicator of coaching ability (I know a few average lifters who are good coaches), it does typically open the doors of communication on strength related topics. If you are going to coach people, you owe it to them to be honest about your track record. Having done a few meets doesn’t make you qualified to coach. I understand that it’s a free market and people can spend their money how they please. However, that doesn’t mean you should be lying about your experience and skill levels. 

If you are a “powerlifting coach,” be prepared to have other coaches comment and criticize. If you aren’t very strong and try to be an Internet personality, then be prepared for ridicule. Being a nice person doesn’t put you above the scrutiny from others. In the past, these same nice people have messaged my clients in the hopes of taking over their coaching. This is why on this site, as well as in life, I try to surround myself with similar values.

The people on this site are fully aware that their thoughts might not always be popular. At times we have differing opinions on various subjects. What remains true is that we all have our own thoughts and philosophies on what proper training should look like. In general these thoughts overlap, although the method of delivery maybe different. We also have the same feelings on what quality coaching and powerlifting should look like. 


Like any job in the world, there are people who suck at it but still get paid. Powerlifting coaches are no different, and a lot of them just aren’t good at their job. Until you as lifters demand more of them, you will continue to see these Internet personalities who don’t even compete steal your money. See it is easy to take a beginner lifter to PRs. Its the next meets that tell the tale.  Ask them questions, have them explain to you the thoughts behind their methods. If your coach can’t give you a detailed answer to why they want you to do something, that is a big red flag! Everything should have a purpose and if they can not tell you why, then it is time to move on. Internet popularity won’t hide lack of knowledge or add any pounds to your total, that much I’m sure we can all agree on.